“Confessions Of Dangerous Minds”; SAATCHI GALLERY London

CONTEMPORARY TURKISH ART IN LONDON…

English newspaper Daily Telegraph announced the Exhibition of Contemporary Turkish Art in Saatchi Gallery gained a great success before the doors of the exhibition had even opened.

It’s sublime that nowadays, our art is spoken about in London and before the doors had even opened, nearly half of the 70 or so works by 19 different artists, most of whom had never exhibited in London before, had been sold. None of those who bought the pieces was Turkish.

The first exhibition managers of Saatchi Gallery, Jason Lee and Carlo Berardi decided to open in London after visiting the Istanbul Contemporary fair in 2008 gained£ 1.3 million in Sotheby auction even in March 2009 when the economic recession was highly seen. One of the most important pieces that are remembered from the auction is Taner Ceylan’s painting,”Ruhani” which was sold for£70.000 to the Turkish collector Omer Koc.

Sotheby’s second sale was an£2.4 million return, which led to the reports saying”Turkey stands to be one of the most exciting contemporary art markets of the next decade.”

The third auction was accompanied by Bonhams’ first contemporary Turkish art sale which brought£1 million and the fourth one brought£2.3 million.

While the exhibition”Confessions of Dangerous Minds” continues, the article noted that the sales achieved£233.000 by now.

A satin and embroidery work of the Pope engulfed by fire, The Sacred Fire of Faith, by 43 year-old Ramazan Bayracoglu was one of the first to go, says Lee, selling for£40,000 to a French collector. A digitally manipulated photographic print, Guns of War, by 32-year-old Ansen Atilla, sold for£25,000; Treacherous Wolf, a bronze sculpture by Yasam Sazmazer, was sold for almost£14,000.

Taner Ceylan’s”1879″ titled painting from the Lost Paintings series soared to a£233.000 record. In the painting which is built with a complex mastership, Ceylan reinterprets the subjects of Orientalism, femininity, veil and look and brings Orientalism in discussion.

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